The Memoirs of General Ulysses S. Grant, Part 3.. The Memoirs of General Ulysses S. Grant, Part 3. 2019-02-17

The Memoirs of General Ulysses S. Grant, Part 3. Rating: 6,8/10 1179 reviews

Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Complete by Ulysses S. Grant

The Memoirs of General Ulysses S. Grant, Part 3.

All the troops and guns from the posts on the abandoned railroad and river were sent to the front. The exact location of Jackson was entirely unknown to Mr. At this point I saw a very comfortable-looking white-haired gentleman seated at the front of his house, a little distance from the road. The young men who would have the fighting to do in case of war, believed all these statements, both in regard to the aggressiveness of the North and its cowardice. Even spies could not get near him, on account of the undergrowth and overflowed lands.

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The Memoirs of General Ulysses S. Grant, Part 1 by Ulysses S. Grant

The Memoirs of General Ulysses S. Grant, Part 3.

The enemy lost many more. The people were no longer molested or made afraid. We were very soon out of range and went peacefully on our way to Cairo, every man feeling that Belmont was a great victory and that he had contributed his share to it. When General Halleck took the field in April, 1862, Sheridan was assigned to duty on his staff. In the 4th infantry, in 1844, at least six line officers were on duty in the staff, and therefore permanently detached from the regiment. He had not pressed me to tarry longer with him because in the early part of my visit a neighbor, a Dr.

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The Annotated Memoirs of Ulysses S. Grant by Elizabeth Samet review

The Memoirs of General Ulysses S. Grant, Part 3.

The engineer officers who made a survey of the front from Bermuda Hundred report against the probability of success from an attack there. The former was burdened with an institution abhorrent to all civilized people not brought up under it, and one which degraded labor, kept it in ignorance, and enervated the governing class. He inquired the number of men the enemy had, and receiving a response indicating a force greater than his own he said if he could be satisfied of that fact he would surrender. In the morning push around the enemy, if you can, and get on to his right rear. Some of his troops were ninety days' men and their time had expired some time before. First: the officer who commanded at Memphis immediately after the city fell into the hands of the National troops had ordered one of the churches of the city to be opened to the soldiers.

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The Memoirs of General Ulysses S. Grant, Part 6. by Ulysses S. Grant

The Memoirs of General Ulysses S. Grant, Part 3.

Hillyer was quite a young man, then in his twenties, and very brilliant. War at all times, whether a civil war between sections of a common country or between nations, ought to be avoided, if possible with honor. Generals Warren and Wright will hold their corps as close to the enemy as possible, to take advantage of any diversion caused by yours and Hancock's attack, and will push in their whole force if any opportunity presents itself. The former of these will endeavor to reach the Tennessee and Virginia Railroad, about south of Covington, and if found practicable will work eastward to Lynchburg and return to its base by way of the Shenandoah Valley, or join you. The call was for 75,000 volunteers for ninety days' service.

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Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Part 3. by Ulysses S. (Ulysses Simpson) Grant by Ulysses S. (Ulysses Simpson) Grant

The Memoirs of General Ulysses S. Grant, Part 3.

McClernand was at that time in Springfield, Illinois. General Wallace's division was stationed, the First brigade at Crump's landing, the Second out two miles, and the Third two and a half miles out. Officers and crew then surrendered. This was brought by a courier. I had been three years at West Point with Pope and had served with him a short time during the Mexican war, under General Taylor. I told him, however, that if he would remain in Memphis I did not believe the Confederate government would ever molest him. He is a bit hard on George Thomas, but other than that, he is very gracious to all, but will give faint praise to those whom he believes did not perform well.

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Ulysses Grant's Memoirs, Jun 24 2018

The Memoirs of General Ulysses S. Grant, Part 3.

I took no copy when it was written. They felt that this change of period released them from the obligation of re-volunteering. In fact an opportunity occurred for it to perform a conspicuous act of gallantry which elicited the highest commendation from division commanders in the Army of the Tennessee. No progress was being made in any other field, and we had to go on. The effect would be demoralizing to the troops and injurious to their health.

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The Memoirs of General Ulysses S. Grant, Chapter 3

The Memoirs of General Ulysses S. Grant, Part 3.

Running aground, he was obliged to abandon his vessel. I was led to believe that this was an unusually frank and forthcoming biography by an American president. He was to get as near the enemy as possible during the day and intrench himself so as to hold his position until the next morning. The canvass in the Presidential campaign the fall before had brought out a young lawyer by the name of John A. The period, however, was marked by a few incidents which were novel to me. Nevertheless I was always prepared to take advantage of them in case they did.

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The Memoirs of General Ulysses S. Grant, Part 2. by Ulysses S. Grant

The Memoirs of General Ulysses S. Grant, Part 3.

He portrayed himself in the persona of the honorable Western hero, whose strength lies in his honesty and straightforwardness. Nearly every case he treated recovered. Gillmore joins Butler with ten thousand men, and the two operate against Richmond from the south side of the James River. However, the general plan, you understand, is for Sherman, with the force brought with him strengthened by a division from your command, to effect a crossing of the Tennessee River just below the mouth of Chickamauga; his crossing to be protected by artillery from the heights on the north bank of the river to be located by your chief of artillery , and to secure the heights on the northern extremity to about the railroad tunnel before the enemy can concentrate against him. Since the first call of the President I have been serving on the staff of the Governor of this State, rendering such aid as I could in the organization of our State militia, and am still engaged in that capacity. If their services can be rewarded by promotion to the rank of Major-Generals in the regular army the honor would be worthily bestowed, and I would feel personally gratified. We landed in front of a cornfield.

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The Annotated Memoirs of Ulysses S. Grant by Elizabeth Samet review

The Memoirs of General Ulysses S. Grant, Part 3.

By the last of August the cholera had so abated that it was deemed safe to start. On the 5th again I suggested, from Oxford, to Halleck that if the Helena troops were at my command I though it would be possible to take them and the Memphis forces south of the mouth of the Yazoo River, and thus secure Vicksburg and the State of Mississippi. A revealing pictures of the times and the wars. The host, however, was not pressing, so that I declined the invitation and, mounting my horse, rode on. General Mackenzie's cavalry and one division of the 5th corps were immediately ordered to his assistance. The work I found congenial, and I determined to continue it.

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