The First Tycoon: The Epic Life of Cornelius Vanderbilt. BOOKS: The First Tycoon: The Epic Life of Cornelius Vanderbilt 2019-02-26

The First Tycoon: The Epic Life of Cornelius Vanderbilt Rating: 9,4/10 611 reviews

A Tricky God

The First Tycoon: The Epic Life of Cornelius Vanderbilt

He did not realize what a mistake this was because he offended Vanderbilt. If not, I would stay away from this book because you will never reach the ending. Again, he outsmarted his competition and almost gained a monopoly in railroading. Then he thought better of it—then he gave up again. I wrote about Lincoln in The First Tycoon. Vanderbilt would sooner start writing in Russian than write such things.

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First Tycoon:The Epic Life of Cornelius Vanderbilt

The First Tycoon: The Epic Life of Cornelius Vanderbilt

I actually liked much of the personal. Over the course of their lives, these starkly contrasting businessmen would mix partnership and rivalry in a bewildering dance of mutual respect and self-interest. By temperament and necessity however, he was given not to reflection, but to movement. John's Park Freight Depot, which was slated for destruction, to its current location. Ronald Reagan's persona appears for many to have become unmoored from the facts that describe his presidency, he contends.

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First Tycoon: The Epic Life of Cornelius Vanderbilt

The First Tycoon: The Epic Life of Cornelius Vanderbilt

Some parts of this book seemed so drawn out and overly detailed but after finishing this book I felt like I got a true sense of who Vanderbilt was and what he accomplished. Finally, on the afternoon of May 16, 1826, he wobbled out of his house to the corner of Hudson and Beach streets, where he collapsed and died. Vanderbilt's life, you might find it more fruitful and less confusing to read this one. Library of Congress Famous as Vanderbilt's enemy in the Erie War of 1868, an epic fight over the Erie Railway Daniel Drew spent most of his life as Vanderbilt's secret partner. In what follows there are fascinating parts such as Vanderbilt and the Nicaragua enterprise, the Civil War and almost anything about the family. Steamboat acquisitions and sales and partnerships, followed by railroad acquisitions and sales and mergers and consolidations and the gold standard and moving off the gold standard and dividends and watering the stock. Both as portrait of an American original and as a book that brings to life an important slice of American history long neglected, this is biography at its very best.

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First Tycoon: The Epic Life of Cornelius Vanderbilt

The First Tycoon: The Epic Life of Cornelius Vanderbilt

He conquered the Steamboat and the Railroads -- both interesting -- but using many of the same techniques and philosophy. The First Tycoon gives us a sweeping account of his rise from boatman to steamboat entrepreneur, from builder of the nation's largest fleet of steamships to lord of a railroad empire. At least nine would die from the scalding shock wave of steam, and two more were sealed in the sunken hull. Stiles raised serious doubts about the claims and secret sources about Vanderbilt. I have enjoyed reading this excellent in-depth biography. Seeing that the cause was hopeless, Vanderbilt ordered the men to cut its lines and set it adrift, lest a sloop at the dock catch fire as well. William Walker, the private American citizen who launched an invasion of Nicaragua and immensely screwed up Vanderbilt's business interests in building a canal there.

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Tycoon Epic Life Cornelius Vanderbilt, Mar 13 2011

The First Tycoon: The Epic Life of Cornelius Vanderbilt

In the early hours of his rise, though, his ambition seems most striking, defining both his personal and historical role. At some point in the twentieth century, even the smallest, most remote communities in America would find themselves woven seamlessly into the national—even the international—financial system. The two captains ordered their deckhands to cast off the lines. With panache and admirable ease, Stiles maps the financial and political currents on which Vanderbilt buccaneered and shows that it was Vanderbilt, more than anyone else, who enabled business to evolve into Big Business. This was not a majority stake, and William and his sons retained a large percentage of the hundreds of thousands of remaining shares; but the family now worked closely with Morgan, who served as maestro of a banking syndicate that established interlocking directorates in the major railroads to tamp down the competition that had driven so many lines into bankruptcy. Gould, Fisk and Eldridge intent on driving out Drew-- Corruption that lead to losses and a legal comedy within stocks and shares trading world. The Supreme Court had eliminated Ogden and the Livingstons as competitors, but in so doing had unleashed anarchy upon a business long restrained by law and custom.

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The First Tycoon

The First Tycoon: The Epic Life of Cornelius Vanderbilt

He was a pioneer of shipping, later railroads, but most importantly big corporations. But those who brave its heft will find many rewards. The Livingston clan was stunned by the Supreme Court's decision. It was the reflection of a man who had just won the biggest victory of his life. See how all of them went to bed happily last night.

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First Tycoon: The Epic Life of Cornelius Vanderbilt

The First Tycoon: The Epic Life of Cornelius Vanderbilt

Cornelius rose to become one of the wealthiest men in the United States by the time of his death. Of English descent, she married into an old Dutch family on Staten Island. The robust social scene in New York among such men of go-ahead startled the pious Peck. One shipper spent his life attempting to break this monopoly. And like Jesse James, Vanderbilt opened a window on the making of modern America. A: I weeded out most of the stuff from the South that was really offensively racist.

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9781400031740: The First Tycoon: The Epic Life of Cornelius Vanderbilt

The First Tycoon: The Epic Life of Cornelius Vanderbilt

As outrage spread, Jacob defended himself in a letter to the New York newspapers. The First Tycoon is the fullest, most perceptive chronicle ever written of the life and times of Cornelius Vanderbilt, the epitome of unfettered, winner-take-all capitalism. It struck down the New York steamboat monopoly as an affront to Congress's exclusive jurisdiction over interstate commerce, refuting the claim that the states shared power in that area. You may start with open and spirited competition, but as winners emerge and losers fall away, your free market tends to constrict and become a little less than free. So it makes perfect sense that the name General Jackson appeared on the side of the Hudson River steamboat commanded by Jacob Vanderbilt, Cornelius's younger brother. The witness was Daniel B.

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