Brainstorm: Harnessing the Power of Productive Obsessions. Eric Maisel MP3: The Power Of Productive Obsession 2019-01-10

Brainstorm: Harnessing the Power of Productive Obsessions Rating: 9,5/10 1214 reviews

Brainstorm

Brainstorm: Harnessing the Power of Productive Obsessions

Maisel uses a lot of quotes from people in his groups to add substance to the book. Do you feel in control of your obsession or does it feel in control of you? Every aspect of our culture has something to sell you and needs to grab your attention. These unwanted obsessions arise because we are anxious creatures. Our unproductive thoughts keep cycling repeatedly to the beat of that anxiety and produce negative obsessions. I would recommend The War of Art by Pressfield or The Creative Habit by Tharp for people looking to get their big projects moving. Ninety-nine times the conclusion is false.

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HARNESSING THE POWER OF PRODUCTIVE OBSESSIONS

Brainstorm: Harnessing the Power of Productive Obsessions

We usually think of obsessions as negative. They aren't fueled by anxiety but by our conscious decisions about where we want to apply our brain's power. Much of the difficulty in pursuing a productive obsession is how exhausting it can feel to repeatedly switch gears between your normal life and your obsessive life. Too many people allow themselves to worry about nothing, wasting neurons. But it is not enough to possess a perfectly good brain — you must also use it.

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Brainstorm : harnessing the power of productive obsessions (Book, 2010) [drfriendless.com]

Brainstorm: Harnessing the Power of Productive Obsessions

All you have to do is secretly doubt that your efforts matter. When you engage your mind with an idea ripe enough to drip juice, large enough to fill an auditorium, fascinating enough to seduce, gripping enough to hold you enthralled, you scoot boredom out the door, make sense of your days, and live your reasons for being. They allow themselves to worry about next to nothing, wasting neurons. The hundredth time I am right. This is an obsession that can produce healthy positive things or ideas that will benefit mankind, if not mankind, then at least Obsession according to Eric Maisel is the pursuit of some thing or idea to the extent that nothing else in the world matters.

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Book Review: Brainstorm: Harnessing the Power of Productive Obsessions by Eric Maisel

Brainstorm: Harnessing the Power of Productive Obsessions

Figure out if an internal fear of failure or rejection or something else is keeping you from pursuing your goal. A: Naturally the book is full of tips for getting started. They live in the San Francisco Bay Area. His most recent book is Brainstorm: Harnessing the Power of Productive Obsessions. Q: How can people get started productively obsessing? The book is structured loosely around the progress of a typical productive obsession. The successful completion of your project is then only the beginning of the next obsession. It struck me as containing advice of varying degrees of usefulness to me at the moment.

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Harnessing The Power of Productive Obsessions

Brainstorm: Harnessing the Power of Productive Obsessions

Maybe you'll become obsessed with orchids, typefaces, birds, insects, or the tides: these are among the productive obsessions you'll encounter as we proceed. We obsess about some trivial matter at work and, having resolved that matter, we obsess about the next trivial matter at work. The range of productive obsessions is truly startling and it's also fascinating how many of these private obsessions end up helping society in some concrete, public way. A productive obsession, whether an idea for a novel, a business, or a vaccine, is chosen deliberately and pursued with determination. It is a platitude that the average brain is not used well or often enough.

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Brainstorm

Brainstorm: Harnessing the Power of Productive Obsessions

In Brainstorm he addresses the reader as fellow creator, and encourages the most expansive perspective, and the most committed, deepest leap into meaning making. Maybe you know exactly which one to select. Why were we as a species burdened by this debilitating penchant for starting things with great energy and and allowing the fire to die out in no time? Some can actually make a real difference both at a personal level and for those around us. When you live your life as a series of productive obsessions, your interest never flags and life feels genuinely worth living. Headstone Where will your productive obsession take you? A: Our body would like some exercise — but that doesn't mean that we get up and exercise.

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Brainstorm: Harnessing the Power of Productive Obsessions

Brainstorm: Harnessing the Power of Productive Obsessions

Most of our obsessions are not of our own choosing and do not serve us. The brain can also productively obsess—and it really wants to. This kind of obsessing gets us, like a hamster on a wheel, nowhere. When you live your life as a series of productive obsessions, your interest never flags and life feels genuinely worth living. When you engage your mind with an idea ripe enough to drip juice, large enough to fill an auditorium, fascinating enough to seduce, gripping enough to hold you enthralled, you scoot boredom out the door, make sense of your days, and live your reasons for being. Marketers do not want you to be thinking too strenuously about your budding symphony or your scientific research and miss their sales pitch.

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Brainstorm: Harnessing the Power of Productive Obsessions by Eric Maisel

Brainstorm: Harnessing the Power of Productive Obsessions

A: Absolutely — your goal isn't to rev yourself up into a clinical mania, forget to pay the rent, cavalierly ignore your loved ones, or drive other good thoughts out of your brain. They aren't in our control — in fact, they control us. Productively obsessing is an antidote to all that. You'll discover how to use your brain as your ally and go beyond what you thought possible. He also conducts writing workshops and trains creativity coaches. It is exactly what Eric Maisel describes in these pages: the harnessing of a productive obsession! The idea behind a productive obsession is that it gives your brain something to focus on, something that will help you channel your mental energies into something more productive than the hamster-wheel spinning of worries, fears, or regrets that can sap your energy. Our own nervous system puts us under enormous pressure and produces all sorts of unhappy effects.

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Eric Maisel MP3: The Power Of Productive Obsession

Brainstorm: Harnessing the Power of Productive Obsessions

What's important in this regard is that you have a real life to turn to, because if your everyday life isn't working for you, you'll be inclined to keep percolating away with your obsession. I can tell that sometimes I would love to stop obsessing and just have a meal with somebody or take in a movie or do something normal, but it is harder to contrive a normal evening than it is to keep obsessing. He is also a California-licensed marriage and family therapist. Productive obsession marries the idea of meaning investment — the investment we must make in our existential choices — with the idea of critical thinking. There are tips for dealing with each of these. You are too busy and engrossed to notice even your own misgivings about the universe.

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Brainstorm: Harnessing the Power of Productive Obsessions by Eric Maisel

Brainstorm: Harnessing the Power of Productive Obsessions

In the second case it is very hard, sometimes verging on impossible, to open that can without courting an explosion. An idea for an Internet business wakes you up in the middle of the night and, because you let it, it turns into a brainstorm. These are the big ideas and visions that great people pursue with the kind of devotion that is required to do anything long term and large scale. Brainstorm asks us to look at that one thing we obsess about. With this provocative departure from the usual lifestyle manual, the Maisels are out to break us of those tendencies. I suspect that he got a lot of pushback from his academic peers for this idea and hence this book is a somewhat d This book starts out okay and then finishes with a wimper. They allow themselves to be ruled by a perpetual to-do list, running from errand to chore to chore to errand, wasting neurons.

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